SheWired Shot of the Day: Meryl Streep's First American Vogue Cover!

The Iron Lady star becomes the iconic mag's oldest cover girl.
By: Lily Shavick
December 13 2011 5:45 PM

There is a moment in just about every workday when we come across something sexy, gratuitous and completely pointless that we wish we could post but don't under the auspices of there being nothing lesbian about it and often there being no redeeming value. Well, we at SheWired have made an executive decision to just throw any of our pseudo-feminist caution to the wind and to just post our favorite shot of the day, whether it be sexy, salacious, or just because…

Meryl Streep graces January’s U.S. Vogue, marking her first solo cover for the glamorous fashion magazine.

Streep is coincidentally, the oldest person ever on Vogue’s cover, a title formerly held by Priscilla Presley when she posed with her daughter, Lisa Marie, and granddaughter in 2004 at 59-years-old.

Pairing a legendary actress with a legendary lens woman, Streep was photographed by Annie Liebovitz photographed in Upstate New York.

Here, she’s seen  striding through a crop of organic broccoli sustainably farmed by a local farmer. Vogue notes the movie star “has been proselytizing for safe, organic, and ecologically sustainable food for more than a decade now (she fell out with the late Julia Child about wanton overfertilization), and… is a shareholder in the Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) organization.”

Streep’s charming smirk is involuntary, she told Vogue’s Fashion Director, Tonne Goodman, that she “can’t smile and think at the same time." Swoon.

Streep also spoke to the magazine about aging in Hollywood, revealing the multi-award winning performer thought her career was over when at age 40, she was offered three roles to portray a witch.

“Once women passed childbearing age they could only be seen as grotesque on some level.” But with The Bridges of Madison County (1995) she captured “the audience that were my girls, that I knew they’d get it if we could get the movie made…women whose usefulness had passed.”

For more from Streep’s insightful interview and on working with out director Phyllida Lloyd for The Iron Lady, read the full article on Vogue.com.

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