The Real L Word's Newest Hottie: Kiyomi McCloskey

After two seasons of watching lesbians of Los Angeles strut their stuff on The Real L Word, the show — which debuts July 13 — goes bi-coastal. Filming is happening in New York, this year.
By: Diane Anderson-Minshall
June 07 2012 11:00 AM

After two seasons of watching lesbians of Los Angeles strut their stuff on The Real L Word, the show — which debuts July 13 — goes bi-coastal. Filming is happening in New York, this year.

“We're excited and gratified to be picking up the stories of our most beloved season 2 cast members at some truly major and life-altering junctures, and we think it's time to throw down and invite the women of New York to join in and demonstrate the claims they've lobbed at us these past few years — that New York's women have something more to say about lesbian life, something that isn't being said by our Los Angeles ladies,” says creator and executive producer Ilene Chaiken. “Bring it on, Brooklyn!”

We caught up with one new cast mate, Kiyomi McCloskey, a member of the band Hunter Valentine, to chat about the new season.

How different are the lesbians of NY and LA?

I feel like lesbians in New York are a little more straightforward and gritty, but at the same time I can't speak to the Los Angeles lesbian experience because I haven't spent enough time there. Everyone on the west coast has been extremely gracious to us so far.

How different will this season be from previous seasons?

I feel like this season portrays a different variety of women in their careers. I am happy to say that I think season three showcases a very diverse group of women within the queer community. This season really hits the mark.

What made you want to subject your private lives to reality TV stardom?

We, as a band, felt like we wanted to expose what it was like to be in a professional, touring rock band. There is often the misconception that bands just hang out and get by; this will prove otherwise.

What’s the most embarrassing part of having cameras follow you around?

I think being on a reality show is more about being able to make yourself completely vulnerable. Sometimes that can be embarrassing and sometimes it just feels OK.

What surprised you the most about the show?

The fact that you have to be available 24/7.

What do you hope fans take away from it?

I hope that fans and new audiences will take away the music most importantly. I also hope that this season represents lesbians across the board. I think that we have a really eclectic cast for season three and I hope that people around the world will see that.

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